INDIAN GOVERNMENT SHOULD TAKE LESSONS FROM NUCLEAR DISASTERS AND THEIR WORST CASE SCENARIOS .INDIAN GOVERNMENT SHOULD COMPLETE ITS SOLAR PROJECT IN LADAKH.

J&K govt to harness 111 GW solar power in Ladakh

https://kavidhakrishnamoorthi559.wordpress.com/2016/01/16/india-should-soon-complete-its-solar-project-in-ladakh-and-should-do-more-farming/

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/JK-govt-to-harness-111-GW-solar-power-in-Ladakh/articleshow/46385901.cms

 

 

"The Ladakh region has a potential of 111 GW of solar power and the governor NN Vohra, has called for urgently removing all existing impediments in effectively harnessing the solar power potential in the State," a Raj Bhawan spokesman said.
.. Read More
JAMMU: The Ladakh region of Jammu & Kashmir also known as cold desert has a vast po
MU: The Ladakh region of Jammu & Kashmir also known as cold desert has a vast potential to produce 111 giga watts (GWS) of solar power and the state government is planning to harness it, a senior official said here on Thursday.“The Ladakh region has a potential of 111 GW of solar power and the governor NN Vohra, has called for urgently removing all existing impediments in effectively harnessing the solar power potential in the State,” a Raj Bhawan spokesman said.

He said that the Governor has directed the Chief Secretary Iabal Khanday to hold an urgent meeting to review, with all the stakeholders, and resolve all existing hurdles

“The State of J&K, with its huge tracts of barren lands in Ladakh, has the potential to produce 111 GW of solar power. Government of India and J&K government have signed an MOU for the development of two mega solar power projects in the Ladakh region of the State (2500 MW in Kargil and 5000 MW in Leh),” he said.

He said that most of the energy generated in these solar parks would be given to the Northern Grid through the presently under construction Leh- Srinagar transmission line.

He said that the state government has already issued solar and hydel power policies for creating an attractive environment for the evacuation, purchase, wheeling and banking of electrical energy generated from Renewable Energy.

He said the state government has devised an incentive package for private power producers including permission to private players to set up solar, hydel, wind and thermal projects of any size in the state,

“The benefits extended would also include, tax holiday for power generation and distribution companies, easy availability of cheap loans, reduction of custom duty for the import of equipments, a favourable debt equity ratio and making competitive bidding mandatory” he said.

http://pib.nic.in/newsite/erelease.aspx?relid=134497

 

Solar Power Capacity Crosses Milestone of 5,000 MW in India

On the auspicious occasion of Makar Sankranti/Pongal, the installed capacity of solar power in India crossed the milestone of 5,000 MW yesterday.  The cumulative installed capacity has reached to 5,130 MW with installed capacity of 1385 MW in current FY.  The state-wise break-up of 5,130 MW is given in the Table below.  The state of Rajasthan stands 1st in the country with 1264 MW, followed by Gujarat (1024MW), Madhya Pradesh (679 MW), Tamil Nadu (419 MW), Maharashtra (379 MW) and Andhra Pradesh (357 MW).

The Government has set the ambitious target of generating 100 GW of solar power by the year 2021-22 under the National Solar Mission. It is envisaged to generate 60 GW ground mounted grid-connected solar power and 40 GW through roof-top grid interactive solar power to fulfill the 100 GW of solar power. The Ministry has also fixed year-wise targets to monitor the solar power generation in the country. The target for the current year is 2,000 MW and next year target is 12,000 MW.  The Ministry is putting all efforts through various schemes of Central Government and State Governments to achieve the targets.  It has been planned that around 18,000 MW tender should be out by 31st March, 2016.

To achieve above stated objective, the Ministry of New & Renewable Energy has initiated several projects like Scheme for Development of Solar Parks and Ultra Mega Solar Power Projects; Scheme for Development of Solar PV Power Plants on Canal Banks/ Canal Tops; Scheme for setting up 300 MW of Grid connected Solar PV Power Projects by Defense Establishments under Ministry of Defense and Para Military Forces with viability Gap Funding; Scheme of setting up 1000 MW of Grid- Connected Solar PV Power Projects by CPSUs with Viability Gap Funding ; Scheme for Setting up of 15000 MW of Grid connected to achieve this target. Solar PV Power Projects by NTPC/NVVN; Setting up of 2000 MW Grid connected solar power with Viability Gap Funding through Solar Energy Corporation of India (SECI). This apart, an ambitious scheme has been launched by the Ministry for roof-top solar installation. Various state governments are coming up with solar power projects under their own policies.

INDIAN GOVERNMENT SHOULD ALSO WARN OTHER STATES WHY SOLAR ENERGY IS THE BEST OPTION FOR FUTURE.

AND THEY SHOULD ALSO MAKE THE STATES REALISE WHAT WILL HAPPEN IN THE FUTURE BY GIVING THEM PRIOR WARNINGS. EVERY STATE HAS A OPTION HOW THEY ARE GOING TO PLAN THEIR FUTURE AND AFTER FEW YEARS THEY SHOULD NOT COMPLAIN OR REGRET FOR WHAT THEY HAVE BUILT.

INDIAN GOVERNMENT SHOULD ALSO WARN THERE IS LOT OF SCOPE OF TERRORISM AND IF THERE IS A BLAST IN ATOMIC REACTORS THEN ONE CAN IMAGINE HOW MANY PEOPLE WILL LOSE THEIR LIVES.

 

Japan’s Fukushima nuclear plant leaks radioactive water

  • 20 February 2014
  • From the sectionAsia
Highly contaminated water leaked from a large storage tank is seen at the H6 area of the contaminated water storage tanks, Fukushima nuclear plant, 20 February 2014
Image captionThe leak is thought to have occurred after a storage tank overflowed

Around 100 tonnes of highly radioactive water have leaked from a storage tank at Japan’s Fukushima nuclear plant, operator Tokyo Electric (Tepco) says.

The toxic water may have overflowed after a valve was left open by mistake, Tepco said.

However the water was unlikely to have reached the ocean, the operator added.

The plant, which was damaged by an earthquake and tsunami in 2011, has faced multiple problems including leaks and power cuts since the disaster.

The latest leak is the most serious since August, when the plant leaked 300 tonnes of water, prompting Japan’s nuclear agency to raise the incident’s alert level.

‘Contaminated earth’

The water from Wednesday’s leak was radioactive, with a reading of 230 million becquerels per litre of radioactive isotopes, Tepco spokesman Masayuki Ono told reporters.

A becquerel is a unit used to measure radioactivity. WHO guidance advises against drinking water with radioactivity levels higher than 10 becquerels per litre.

Tepco says the radioactive water overflowed from a storage tank on Wednesday, but the leak was not discovered for several hours, the BBC’s Rupert Wingfield-Hayes in Tokyo reports.

The operator says the leak occurred when contaminated water was accidentally pumped into a large storage tank that was already full, our correspondent adds.

“We apologise for worrying the public with such a leak,” Mr Ono said. “Water is unlikely to have reached the ocean as there is no drainage in that tank area.”

“We are now in the process of recovering the leaked water and the earth it has contaminated,” he added.

On 11 March 2011, an earthquake and tsunami crippled the plant. Waves knocked out cooling systems for the reactors, leading to meltdowns at three of them.

Water is being pumped in to cool the reactors. However, this creates large amounts of contaminated water that must be stored securely.

The Fukushima nuclear power plant suffered a number of setbacks last year, including worker errors and a series of toxic water leaks that have lead to concerns contaminated water is mixing with groundwater that is flowing into the sea.

INDIA SHOULD FOLLOW  THE METHODS OF RENEWABLE ENERGY USED IN HOLLAND FOR BETTER FUTURE.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renewable_energy_in_the_Netherlands

Renewable energy in the Netherlands

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Despite the historic usage of wind power to drain water and grind grain, the Netherlands lags behind most EU countries in the production of energy from renewable sources. The flat and often sub-sea level landscape limits hydropower resources and the country does not lie in a region of high geothermal potential. The leading renewable power sources are biomass, wind, solar and geothermal. In 2010, the Netherlands produced only 3.7%, up from only 1% in 1990.[1]

Three hydropower plants provide almost all of the Netherlands’ hydropower. In 2010, the Netherlands had 1973 wind turbines including 98 in two offshore windfarms. The turbines had a total nameplate capacity of 2237 MW. Flevoland was the leading province for wind energy with Groningen second in capacity and production. The Netherlands had 88 MW of solar electricity and 98 MW of manure digesters in 2010.[1]

In 2009 the Netherlands used 3,9% wind power of electricity (278/ 7,073) [2] The wind capacity installed at end 2010 will, in a normal wind year, produce 4.1% of electricity, when the equivalent value for Germany is 9.4% and Portugal 14%.[3]

In the Netherlands, household consumers can choose to buy renewable electricity. For 2008, the amount of renewable energy used by household users is increasing. Halfway through 2010 it was 44%, up from 38% in 2008 and 41% in 2009.[4] A large part of the renewable electricity sold in the Netherlands comes from Norway, a country which generates almost all its electricity with hydropower plants.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s