AFTER 60 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE KERALA HAS THE MOST CONTAMINATED WATER AND THEY VEGETABLES GROWN CANT BE CONSUMED IT MEANS BEFORE INDEPENDENCE WATER WAS SUITABLE FOR DRINKING

AFTER 60  YEARS 

Kerala has the worst unhygienic domestic water supply in the whole of India

Waterborne diseases on the rise in Kollam

High pesticide content found in vegetables across Kerala

10 of 44 lots of vegetables show organo chloro residue

There is fresh evidence of the undesirable extent of pesticide content in vegetables available across markets in Kerala. A report prepared by the Food Quality Monitoring Laboratory under the Council for Food Research and Development (CFRD) indicates presence of pesticides that has rendered several lots of vegetables unfit for human consumption.

Forty-four lots of vegetables collected from the markets in December were analysed for presence of organo chloro pesticides at the laboratory, the report accessed by The Hindu shows. Ten samples contained organo chloro residue. Of these, five samples had residue above permissible limits, which meant they were unfit for human consumption.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/kerala/high-pesticide-content-found-in-vegetables-across-kerala/article5569659.ece

 

70% HOUSES IN KERALA LACK ACCESS TO SAFE DRINKING WATER

http://indiasanitationportal.org/1869

Kerala has most contaminated drinking water THIS IS THE WORST CASE IN INDIA.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/kerala/kerala-has-most-contaminated-drinking-water/article4511832.ece

 

SO WHAT DEVELOPMENT HAS TAKEN PLACE IN KERALA WHERE PEOPLE DONT HAVE PROPER DRINKING WATER.

THIS IS KERALA STANDS TODAY IN FRONT OF THE WHOLE WORLD SO WHERE IS DEVELOPMENT. 

Rural households in Kerala are the worst hit with only 29.5% having access to safe drinking water, according to the study.

Toxic industrial waste contaminates water, poisons lives in Kerala’s Kollam district

Kollam:  Nearly 300 families living within a radius of 500 metres of a metals industry in Kerala’s Kollam district have been suffering for almost a decade because of toxic waste from the plant contaminating their groundwater. 

For residents like Anoop, a class 7 student with severe allergies on his feet, or Chellama, in her 70s, having sores on her back and burns marks on legs, living next to the Kerala Minerals and Metal Limited in Chittoor village has only brought suffering and diseases. 

With the groundwater in the area fully contaminated from the toxic industrial waste, the land has gone to waste and paddy fields have been deserted.

“All of us here are suffering from some sickness or the other. There are people with breathing problems, skin problems, even cancer,” Neetu, a medical student in the village, says.

Susamma, a mother of three, says, “There is no water to drink anywhere. We get water supply once a week in a limited quantity.”

NDTV did a test by inserting litmus paper in the water accumulated in a paddy field. The blue litmus turned into light red, a clear indication of acidic presence.

MK Salim, an activist from Kollam, says, “People cannot live here. They don’t know anything about the Public Insurance Act which is still in effect. Ministers come and go. They say they will take over the land but when?” 

Dr Sahadullah, chairman of the Kerala Institute of Medical Sciences, says the contamination can cause erosion in the mouth and skin diseases. Acid coupled with other industrial pollutants like mercury and lead can also cause diseases affecting blood vessels and cancer, he says.

The latest pollution study in the area says the contamination is spreading, with the report urging the company to take remedial steps.

“The contamination is slowly spreading towards the surrounding areas through alluvial aquifers… The study reveals groundwater contamination in the wells behind the KMML upto 500 meters from the boundary is high… The company has to take remedial measures urgently to ensure acidic effluents are neutralised before discharge,” the report states. 

The company claims the contamination is only limited to 125 metres within the plant. “We have stored the slurry safely, according to the international norms prescribed. Of course there will be contamination of water. We have decided to acquire the severely affected land of nine acres,” an official said.

Despite the residents struggling for a decade, the lack of a comprehensive study on their health is alarming. “The true cause has to be understood. There has to be an intensive study and only then can we comment about it,” Kollam’s Collector, Pranav Jyotinatha, says.

Meanwhile, the angry locals say they are forced to live with a fundamental right denied to them: the right to life.

 

Kerala has most contaminated drinking water

Kerala has the highest chemical/bacterial contaminated drinking water among 28 tested States in the country, according to the Union Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation, the State’s Economic Review for 2011-2012 has stated.

As on January 9 this year, out of the total 1,02,900 tested sources in the State, nearly 34 per cent had been identified with contamination of iron, fluoride, salinity, nitrate, arsenic and other bacteria with Kozhikode district having the most contaminated water in the State.

Out of 10,803 tested sources, 54 per cent were found to be contaminated there while Thiruvananthapuram, Kannur, Kasaragod, Ernakulam and Palakkad being the other vulnerable districts in terms of access to safe drinking water in the State.

The Review, which states that there was a mistaken notion that Kerala was abundant in water resources.. ……….More from the Hindu website.

Again, one year before the previous report in the Hindu on March 15, 2012, it says

70% houses in Kerala lack access to safe drinking water

Having a kitchen in the house is a priority for an overwhelming majority of Malayalis, but safe drinking water remains a dream for more than 70 per cent of the households in the State while 3.8 per cent still defecate in the open.

The latest Census figures reveal that Kerala pales in comparison with most other States in access to piped drinking water. Only 29.3 per cent of the houses in the State are serviced by the water supply network and just 23.4 per cent get treated water. While Union Territories of Chandigarh (96.7) and Puducherry (95.3) top the list, 19 States have ensured that more than 50 per cent of their population has access to tap water.

Sixty-two per cent of the households in Kerala depend on wells for drinking water, 1.4 per cent of houses rely on springs, 0.2 per cent on rivers and canals and 0.7 per cent on tanks, ponds and lakes, exposing themselves to bacterial and chemical contamination.

While 0.7 per cent use hand pumps to draw water, 3.7 per cent are serviced by tubewells. The figures show that 77.7 per cent of households have drinking water sources within their premises, 14.1 per cent near the premises and 8.2 per cent away… …..More from the Hindu newspaper website.

Report on the study of drinking water quality in Kerala in 2011 by the Division of Biological Sciences, Centre for Ecological Sciences.

Evaluation of the Quality of Drinking Water in Kerala State, India. An article in the Asian Journal of Water, Environment and Pollution

“The quality of tap water from water supplies from 14 districts of Kerala state, India was studied. Parameters like pH, water temperature, total dissolved solids, salinity, nitrates, chloride, hardness, magnesium, calcium, sodium, potassium, fluoride, sulphate, phosphates, and coliform bacteria were enumerated. The results showed that all water samples were contaminated by coliform bacteria. About 20% of the tap water samples from Alappuzha and 15% samples from Palakkad district are above desirable limits prescribed by Bureau of Indian Standards. The contamination of the source water (due to lack of community hygiene) and insufficient treatment are the major cause for the coliform contamination in the state. Water samples from Alappuzha and Palakkad have high ionic and fluoride content which could be attributed to the geology of the region. Water supplied for drinking in rural areas are relatively free of any contamination than the water supplied in urban area by municipalities, which may be attributed higher chances of contamination in urban area due to mismanagement of solid and liquid wastes. The study highlights the need for regular bacteriological enumeration along with water quality in addition to setting up decentralised region specific improved treatment system. 

.

Waterborne diseases on the rise in Kollam

 

The number of people infected with waterborne diseases like hepatitis A, typhoid and acute diarrhoea is on the rise in Kollam district since the last two years, according to a report submitted by district epidemiologist Rakesh P.S. to District Collector P.G. Thomas last week.

The report underlines that poor water quality poses a major threat to human health in the district. The high-risk areas in this connection are Palathara, Sooranad, Kalakode, Velinelloor and Nilamel. An evident scarcity of drinking water in the district which is forcing people to depend on sources of water which are not safe is one of the main causes for this development.

Hepatitis A

The report says that the number of people infected with hepatitis A in the district has increased from 145 in 2010 to 734 in 2011 and has touched 764 till September 2012. The number of people infected with hepatitis A from Kollam district in 2011 was nearly 16 per cent of the total figure of the State. The trend is continuing this year too.

Hepatitis A is associated with inadequate water supply, poor sanitation and poor hygiene leading to infection and inflammation of the liver. The disease is often transmitted through contaminated water and food.

Typhoid

The report says that the number of typhoid cases reported to the Kollam unit of the Integrated Disease Surveillance Project (IDSP) has increased from 28 in 2010 to 62 in 2011 and touched an alarming 113 till September this year. Typhoid is caused by bacteria transmitted from faeces to ingestion. Contaminated water is one of the pathways for transmission of the disease. People become infected after consuming food that has been handled by persons who are infected with the disease or by drinking water that has been contaminated by sewage containing the bacteria. Clean water, hygiene and good sanitation prevent the spread of the disease.

Diarrhoea

The number of acute diarrhoeal disease (ADD) is also on the rise. The number of ADD cases reported to the Kollam IDSP increased from 7,717 in 2010 to 10,821 in 2011 and has touched 8,670 till September this year. The report says that ADD is a symptom of infection caused by a host of bacterial, viral and parasitic organisms, most of which can be spread by contaminated water.

Calling for urgent action to arrest the spread of these waterborne diseases, Dr. Rakesh’s report says that in the district there is widespread contamination of water sources mainly caused by the unscientific way of disposing sewage and other solid wastes into water sources.

The report says that though virus and bacteria in the water can be destroyed by boiling water for five minutes, it is not happening especially in eateries, juice stalls, ice manufacturing units and toddy shops. Many eateries are seen mixing hot water with untreated water which is of no use.

 


 

  • Scarcity of drinking water forcing people to depend on unsafe water sources, says report

  • Palathara, Sooranad, Kalakode, Velinelloor and Nilamel among high-risk areas

 

 


 

 

 

 

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